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The two RV Gypsies explored
Ouimet Canyon Provincial Park
in Ontario, Canada
June 25, 2013

Ouimet Canyon's (pronounced we-met) history dates back over a billion years. Hot molten rock rose up from deep within the earth. Below the earth's surface, the magna flowed horizontally to form a huge flat formation called a sill. As the magna cooled, it became a hard rock called diabase. Over several million years, the rocks above the diabase eroded away. Further cooling and exposure resulted in extensive cracking and fracturing the diabase sill. There are several other theories on how the canyon formed.

explore Ouimet Canyon Provincial Park sign
starting up the path at Ouimet Canyon

After a brief walk on a narrow dirt path through the woods, the two RV Gypsies came to a very unique, attractive wooden bridge.

a bridge in Ouimet Canyon
a bridge in Ouimet Canyon

Below: Arriving at the overlook, the two RV Gypsies marvelled at the view.

view from overlook at Ouimet Canyon
view from overlook at Ouimet Canyon

Below: This geologic phenomenon is one of the most spectacular landscapes found in eastern Canada. The Canyon measures 1.9 miles in length and 500 feet across. Protected beneath the boulders, 350 feet below on the canyon floor, are arctic plant species typically found north of the park. To protect this fragile plant community, access to the canyon floor is prohibited.

Karen Duquette and a panorama of Ouimet Canyon in Canada

history bookLegend of the Indian Head: A long time ago, there was a giant Omett. He helped Nanabijou make mountains and lakes. Omett fell in love with Nanabijou's daughter Naiomi. One day, Omett was moving a mountain when part of it fell off and killed Naiomi. Omett quickly hid Naiomi. Nanabijou desperately looked for his daughter. When he sensed something underground, he sent a thunderbolt to split open the ground which created a canyon and he discovered his daughter at its bottom. He buried her there and to punish Omett he turned him into stone and put him on the canyon walls to watch Naiomi's grave forever.

Indian Head at Ouimet Canyon in Canada
Indian Head at Ouimet Canyon in Canada

history bookOuimet Canyon is a large gorge in the Canadian province of Ontario, about 37 miles northeast of Thunder Bay in Dorion Township. The gorge is 330 feet deep, 490 feet wide and 1.2 miles in length, protected in the Ouimet Canyon Provincial Park.

There is a walkway consisting of boardwalks and trails, which leads to viewing platforms overlooking the canyon.

The canyon was named after a former railway station, Ouimet Station, which used to be located nearby on the Canadian Pacific Railway line. The station itself was named after the Canadian Minister of Public Works from 1892 to 1896, Joseph-Aldric Ouimet.

Ouimet Canyon Provincial Park covers an area of 3 square miles around the canyon. This is a day-use park; there are no camping facilities.

Lee Duquette at Ouimet Canyon in Canada

View of the Indian Head

The view of the canyon
from the other side of the lookout

The view of the Indian Head
view of the canyon gorge
panorma of the gorge at Ouimet Canyon in Canada
panorma of the gorge at Ouimet Canyon in Canada
panorma of the gorge at Ouimet Canyon in Canada
panorama of the gorge at Ouimet Canyon in Canada
close-up of the gorge's wall
panorama of the gorge at Ouimet Canyon in Canada

As the two RV Gypsies walked to this lookout at Ouimet Canyon, they wondered where the directional signs were because at times they weren't sure which path to take. As Lee was looked down into the canyon, he saw a yellow sign with directional arrows on it. Yes, his eyesight was just that good. After Karen took the photo of what she perceived to be just a yellow spot, she enlarged it and could indeed see directional arrows on the yellow sign. What a shame that someone would throw the sign down into the canyon.

sign at bottom of the canyon

The two RV Gypsies walked on the wooden boardwalk, until once again; they had to figure out which way to go.

boardwalk at Ouimet Canyon

Karen actually thought that using the rope to get up the short, but steep hill was fun!

Karen Duquette using the rope to get up a steep hill
Karen Duquette using the rope to get up a steep hill

The hill was short but steep. The two RV Gypsies were amazed how easy it was to get up the steep hill with the help of the rope that was there. In all the hiking they have done, this was a first time with a rope.

Lee Duquette using the rope to get up a steep hill
Lee Duquette using the rope to get up a steep hill
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Menu for the two RV Gypsies Adventures
in Nipigon, Ontario, Canada and surrounding areas
June 25 - 26, 2013

You may visit these six sites in any order you choose.

Nipigon Welcome Center

Birch Point

Eagle Canyon Suspension Bridges

Ouimet Canyon

Alexander Dam

Split Rock Trail

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go to the next adventure of the two RV GypsiesAFTER you have seen all six sections above, please continue on to Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada; and the Sleeping Giant, the amazing Kakabeka Falls, a lighthouse, deer, and more