Two RV Gypsies: Full-Time RVers
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The two RV Gypsies enjoyed
The Liberty Bridge at Falls Park
Greenville, South Carolina
May 12, 2010

The beauty of the waterfalls and gardens is enhanced by the graceful lines of the bridge’s architecture and the appealing stonework throughout the park.

A commissioned sculpture by internationally-recognized artist Bryan Hunt, is found at the Main Street entrance to Falls Park. This unique sculpture, Falls Lake Falls, is the second in an edition of three (the original is in Tokyo) and the only piece of its kind on this continent.

sculpture by Bryan Hunt
stone wall that says Falls Park on the Reedy
heading fto the park
a restaurant
At first, the two RV Gypsies wondered why a "no lifeguard" sign was posted, but later they saw that water was spurting up all over the "tracks" area and lots of toddlers and young children were running through the sprinklers.
sign - no lifeguard
train exiting tunnel
clipart of a History bookLong before white settlers arrived, the Cherokee lived and hunted at present-day Greenville. In 1773, the first European settler in the area, Richard Pearis, purchased 10 square miles along the Reedy River from three Cherokee chiefs. Pearis later operated a grist mill at the Upper Falls of the Reedy.

In 1852, Furman Institution (now Furman University) bought the land. Three textile mills and a cotton warehouse operated in the early 1900s, all contributing to the pollution of the Reedy River.

In 1967, the Carolina Foothills Garden Club reclaimed 26 acres for the current park, with the support of the City of Greenville, Furman University and the Planning Commission. Over the next 40 years, the Garden Club and the City of Greenville have worked with individuals, corporations and state and federal agencies to further develop the park, clean up the river and restore the historic Falls Cottage. In 1990, landscape architect Andrea Mains introduced the concept of transforming the park into a regional attraction, with beautiful public gardens and a pedestrian bridge.

the walkway to the bridge
an old building across the Reedy
Below: Both of these bridges lead to the downtown area, a very nice shopping area with lots of restaurants, shops, and small parks.
small bridge going downtown
bigger bridge going downtown
A pathway under this bridge with a picnic area on each side of the pathway
picnic area under a bridge
picnic area under a bridge

The $4.5 million Liberty Bridge does more than span the Reedy River -- it serves as the focal point of Falls Park showcasing man’s creativity alongside nature’s beauty. The bridge is 355-feet long, 12-feet wide, has a horizontal curve radius of 214-feet and 90-foot towers weighing 26 tons each.

The unique design, created by architect Miguel Rosales of Boston will provide spectacular views of Reedy River Falls.

sign about Liberty Bridge

The first glimpse of The Liberty Bridge

glimpse of The Liberty Bridge
glimpse of The Liberty Bridge
glimpse of The Liberty Bridge
In addition to the Reedy River Falls, the bridge is the perfect place to view the magnificent public gardens below the bridge and throughout the park.
flowers
flowers
Walking down the pathway beside the bridge gave the two RV Gypsies different views of the 28 foot falls. This is an amazing waterfall right in the center of the city.
the falls
the falls
the falls
the falls
the falls and bridge
the falls
the falls

The bridge's suspension towers lean downstream at a 15-degree angle. Subtle lighting in the bridge's handrails and from underneath gives it a glowing effect. The two RV Gypsies felt as if they were floating over the park when they were on the bridge.

under the bridge
under the bridge
under the bridge
under the bridge
Liberty Bridge & falls
Liberty Bridge & falls
The two RV Gypsies under the bridge
Karen in the gardens
Lee taking photos
flowers
Karen Duquette
The Reedy curved and flowed over a small fall down the way.
the Reedy
a duck
a duck
a small stream to the right of the curve
a small stream
a small stream
a small stream
The Amphitheater
The Amphitheater
staircase
staircase
There were many benches and swinging benches throughout the park. Karen Duquette has always liked swinging benches.
Lee Duquette resting on a swinging bench
Below: The two 90-foot tall masts weigh more than 28 tons EACH and lean away from the bridge at a 15 degree angle. Two 80 millimeter backstay cables hold the masts in position. Steel piles and rock anchors, 70 feet deep into bedrock, transfer the bridge loads to the ground at the abutments, mast and backstay foundations. This bridge is unique in it geometry and there is nothing like it elsewhere in the USA.
Liberty Bridge - see both masts
clipart of a History bookThe 28 foot Reedy River Falls is where Greenville's first European settler, Richard Pearis established his trading post in 1768. Later he built grist and saw mills here which was the hub of early industry in Greenville until the 1920's.
falls and bridge
falls and bridge 
The two RV Gypsies by The Liberty Bridge
The two RV Gypsies by The Liberty Bridge
The Reedy River
the river
a very small fall
a very small fall
Lee photographing the small falls
Lee Duquette by the small falls
Karen Duquette
small falls
the small falls
Below: The two RV Gypsies took a picture of each other, simultaneously.
Karen taking a picture of Lee
Lee is taking a picture of Karen
small falls
river flowing over rocks
river flowing over rocks
a duck
A great lunch spot for the two RV Gypsies
lunch spot
Lee ready for lunch
The 13.4 million dollar garden and the Liberty Bridge were dedicated on September 10, 2004.
gardens
gardens
Karen Duquette on the bridge - here she really noticed the 15 degree angle of the masts that was mentioned earlier on this page.
Karen on the bridge
on the bridge
Below: The view looking down from the Liberty Bridge
view looking down from the Liberty Bridge
view looking down from the Liberty Bridge
The two RV Gypsies on the Liberty Bridge
river view
Below: The view looking down from other side of bridge
view looking down from other side of bridge
view looking down from other side of bridge
Karen Duquette
The Liberty Bridge
The Liberty Bridge
look below
go to the next adventure of the two RV GypsiesNorthshore Resort at Lake Oconee,
Greensboro, Georgia

A membership resort (ROD); a very unique campground with a train theme, hills too steep to bicycle, a nice lake, 2 pools, and more.

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