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The two RV Gypsies in the city of Moab, Utah
and at Arches National Park

August 17 - 18, 2012

USA map showing location of MOAB, Utahmap showing location of Arches National Park in Uthsign: Arches National Park

Below: Scenery from a rest stop by Moore, Utah and on the way to Moab, Utah. The two RV Gypsies were not sure what the big white structure in the far distance was.

Scenery from a rest stop by Moore, Utah
what on earth is this?

sign: Welcome to the city of Moab, Utah

Moab is a city in Grand County in eastern Utah, in the western United States. Moab hosts a large number of tourists every year, mostly visitors to the nearby Arches and Canyonlands National Parks. The town is a popular base for mountain bikers who ride the extensive network of trails including the famed Slickrock Trail, and off-roaders who come for the annual Moab Jeep Safari.

sign: Spanish Trail RV Park
the RV of the two RV Gypsies at Spanish Trail RV Park

The view from the RV of the two RV Gypsies while parked at Spanish Trail RV Park in Moab, Utah

The view from the RV of the two RV Gypsies

This park was very nice: the sites had trees, small grass patches, and a teensy bit more room between sites than the norm, and were well maintained. It is south of town so a bit out of the touristy chaos, but the road noise was a constant, even late at night. (As you can see in the above photo, the site of the two RV Gypsies was not far from the road, and semi's drove by at all hours).

The two RV Gypsies never use campground restrooms, laundry, or most other amenities, so can not comment on that kind of stuff. There was NO pool, and no hot tub at Spanish Trail RV Park, not that they would have had time to use them anyway. On their next trip here, they will choose a different park.

 

Arches National Park is in eastern Utah. It is known for preserving over 2,000 natural sandstone arches, including the world-famous Delicate Arch (the last arch shown on this site), in addition to a variety of unique geological resources and formations.

The park is located just outside of Moab, Utah, and is 76,679 acres in area. Its highest elevation is 5,653 feet at Elephant Butte, and its lowest elevation is 4,085 feet at the visitor center. Forty-three arches have collapsed due to erosion since 1970. The park receives 10 inches of rain a year on average.

Administered by the National Park Service, the area was originally created as a National Monument on April 12, 1929. It was redesignated as a National Park on November 12, 1971.

sign: Arches National  Park

Below: Views from Arches National Park, showing the road outside the park in each direction.

view from  Arches National  Park
view from  Arches National  Park
sign about Moab Fault
photo showing the Moab fault line

The Park Avenue Trail is one of the first major stops in Arches National Park.

big formation at  Arches National  Park
formation at  Arches National  Park
panorama at  Arches National  Park

Below: zoomed-in photos of the above formations.

formations at Park Avenue at  Arches National  Park
a balanced rock, but not the famous one at  Arches National  Park

A panorama of the formations at Park Avenue. Amazingly, each side of the canyon were quite different in color.

a panorama of the formations at Park Avenue

The two RV Gypsies at the lookout point above the Park Avenue trail

two RV Gypsies at the lookout point

From the Park Avenue trail lookout point, the two RV Gypsies saw people down on the trail.

people on the trail
sign about the Park Avenue Trail at Arches National Park

The following day, the two RV Gypsies returned to Park Avenue and decided to hike the trail; since the above sign said it was an easy hike. The stairs at the beginning of the trail descended quickly and steeply into a beautiful canyon, but this already tired out the two RV Gypsies, so even though the canyon floor itself was flat and easy to walk, the two RV Gypsies only walked a short distance on the trail in order to take a few photos from along the canyon floor and then they returned to their starting point. But for those who are able to hike and do stairs, this is a one-way trail that goes through the Park Avenue area to the Courthouse Towers. This trail just wasn't for the two RV Gypsies at this time.

the two RV Gypsies at  Arches National Park
cliff at Arches National Park
 

laughing clipartGetting the finger at Arches National Park.

at  Arches National Park
getting the finger at  Arches National Park
panorama of Park Avenue at Arches National Park
panorama at Park avenue at Arches National Park

zoomed-in views of the formations shown in the panoramas above.

zoomed-in view of formations
formation at  Arches National Park
Karen Duquette at  Arches National Park

Courthouse Towers Viewpoint - photographing from across the street and directly into the sun gave a red look to the formation.

Courthouse Towers viewpoint at  Arches National Park

Later, but on the same day, a better photo was taken of part of that formation.

The courthouse at  Arches National Park

The sign below tells how arches start as small holes in rock faces and enlarge and eventually collapse from weathering and erosion. Sand grains once formed together as rock are separated and washed away; arches form, grow, mature, and fall.

sign about arches
missing an arch
panorama

Below: The Organ is an impressive "Sandstone Tower".

the Organ formation at  Arches National Park

Balanced Rock is exactly what its name implies: a large rock, balanced upon a narrower pedestal of stone beneath it. The trail has an elevation gain of less than 50 feet, and is short enough to make the trail fun for even the newest of outdoor enthusiasts. It is a loop trail at the bottom of this fragile, picturesque rock formation. (It seems that there is a Balanced Rock almost everywhere the two RV Gypsies went).

Balanced Rock at  Arches National Park
Balanced Rock at  Arches National Park

The two RV Gypsies are not sure what formation this is below, (it might be the Porthole Cave Arch) but as they drove by it, Karen used her zoom lens to photograph it because there was a person standing inside the formation. The two RV Gypsies guess that the person got there from a trail at the back side of the formation.

a window in a cave
a person in the window of a cave

The Windows - North Window, South Window and Turret Arch

The Windows at  Arches National Park

The North Window - see the people in the photo below, right.

sign : The Windows at  Arches National Park
the North Window and small people

Karen Duquette tried to walk up to the North Window, and got about 3/4 of the way there, and decided that she didn't want to go all the way up under the arch, so she just used her zoom lens to take photos. Lee stayed at the bottom of the path and photographed Karen.

Karen Duquette at the North Window at  Arches National Park
a grotto and small window
North Arch at the windows
North Arch at the Windows

This section of the park, known as the Windows, boasts several arches in relatively close proximity. The first is a pair known as the North and South Windows (the left and right arches respectively).

panorama of the Windows at  Arches National Park

Opposite from North and South Windows is the Turret Arch.

the Turret Arch at  Arches National Park
the Turret Arch at  Arches National Park
 
formation at  Arches National Park
formation at Arches National Park

Below: DOUBLE ARCH: This arch started as a cave where a large pothole at the top was continually being dug deeper and deeper by rainwater. Eventually the pothole wore through and created the large pothole-arch known as Double Arch.

Double Atch at  Arches National Park
Double Arch at  Arches National Park
Double Arch at  Arches National Park
person at Double Arch
different view of Double Arch

Arches usually form slowly, but quick and dramatic changes do occur. in 1940, a large boulder suddenly fell out of Skyline Arch, roughly doubling the size of the opening.

   

Below on the left is a sign showing the Skyline Arch before and after the 1940 rockfall.

Below on the right is the present day Skyline Arch. The arch now has a span of 71 feet and a height of 33.5 feet.

poster about Skyline Arch
Skyline Arch at  Arches National Park
sign about the Double Arch trail

Trail Data: Length 0.25 mile one way -

sign about th Double Arch
panorama of the Double Arch
panorama of the Double Arch

Notice how small the people look as they approached the Double Arch at Arches National Park.

The Double Arch and small people
people by the Double Arch

Although the two RV Gypsies look close to the arch (in the photo below on the left), they were not yet close at all. Because the self-timer camera is downhill from them and on the ground, it appeared that they were a lot closer to the arch than they actually were. They are actually about the same distance away as shown in the photo below on the right, where Lee is taking a picture. Interesting!

The two RV Gypsies at the Double Arch
Lee Duquette at the Double Arch

The two RV Gypsies got a lot closer to the arch and they stopped to rest. The trail was easy up to this point, but then it got very rocky by the arch, so the two RV Gypsies decided they were satisfied with the photos and view they already had.

Lee Duquette takes a rest by the arch
Karen Duquette takes a rest by the arch
panorama

The panorama photo above and the two photos below were taken from the same spot. Different type of lens makes everything look quite different.

formation
formation at  Arches National Park

Delicate Arch is the most recognizable arch in Arches National Park, and perhaps anywhere in the world. It also happens to be located along one of the most dynamic hiking trails within Arches National Park. More than 480 feet above the parking lot and trailhead in the valley below, Delicate Arch is hidden in a bowl at the top of one of the park’s famous sandstone fins. Delicate Arch is freestanding, and magnificently alone in the natural sandstone bowl, standing out against the multitude of horizontal planes around it. The arch was once part of the upper section of the fin, until erosion took its toll upon the sandstone throughout the years, and now Delicate Arch is all that remains of that Entrada sandstone formation.

sign about the Delicate Arch Viewpoint trails

As stated in the sign above, there are two very different trails in this area from which to see Delicate Arch. The two RV Gypsies chose the lower trail which was an easy 5-minute walk. You can see from the panorama that the lookout is actually a very far distance from Delicate Arch itself.

panorama of Delicate Arch at  Arches National Park

Below: Lee taking the above panorama photo.

Lee taking the above panorama photo.

Even with Karen's zoom lens, Delicate Arch could not be photographed well from this lookout point.

Delicate Arch
Delicate Arch
Look below

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