Two RV Gypsies: Full-Time RVers
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The two RV Gypsies entered South Dakota
and explored Palisades State Park

welcome to South Dakota sign

Before driving to Palisades State Park, the two RV Gypsies stopped at Glacial Lakes Rest Stop in New Effington, SD - and learned a bit about the state. The historical marker shown below is located on the southbound rest area alon I-29 south of the North Dakota/South Dakota border. Its text is quoted below the photo of the historical marker. Scroll down to learn some of South Dakota's history, then continue scrolling to explore Palisades State Park and its glorious rock formations

South Dakota historical Marker

History storybookSouth Dakota estern heritage has been remembered along the Interstate highway system at safety rest areas and tourist information centers.

"The eight pillars which thrust skyward here merge in the framework of a teepee, the Plains Indian home. The one-by-one-and-a-half foot concrete lodge poles rise fifty-six feet in the air and weigh six-and-one-half tons each. The structures were executed in an architectural manner reflecting the spiritual lifestyle of the nomadic Lakota (Sioux) Nation.

"The Coteau des Prairie country to the south of this rest area was one of the parts of South Dakota first settled by the Lakota tribes. The Coteau country was formed by the last great glacier which reached across South Dakota as far as the Missouri River. As it melted, thousands of ground-out potholes became glacial lakes. To the southeast, Lakes Traverse and Big Stone represent remnants of a mighty river which drained archaic Lake Agassiz in Canada.

"Fur traders and voyageurs found this lake country to be prime trapping and trading territory: they may have arrived in the area as early as 1679. At that time the Santee Sioux consisting of the Wahpeton, Sisseton, Mdewakanton, and Wahpekute tribes were moving into the lakes region. Nearly two centuries later the Santees ceded this part of South Dakota to the United States in Treaty of Traverse des Sioux. 1851.

"The U.S. Army established one of the earliest military posts in South Dakota in 1864 at Fort Sisseton, 36 miles (57 kilometers) southwest of here. That post was abandoned by the army in 1889, and is now a South Dakota state park. Actual white settlement did not begin until the reservation area of the Sisseton-Wahpeton was open in 1892.”

the framework of the Plains Indian home

As quoted above: The eight pillars which thrust skyward here merge in the framework of a teepee, the Plains Indian home. The one-by-one-and-a-half foot concrete lodge poles rise fifty-six feet in the air and weigh six-and-one-half tons each. The structures were executed in an architectural manner reflecting the spiritual lifestyle of the nomadic Lakota (Sioux) Nation.

Looking skyward on a gloomy day from below the pillars.
Looking skyward  at the top of the pillars
Looking skyward  at the top of the pillars
sign: Eisenhower Interstate System
sign about the Glacial Lakes & Prairies in SD
sign about th Rivers, Lakes & Streams in SD
sign about what kids love in SD

Driving along in South Dakota, the two RV Gypsies saw a semi-truck hauling a windmill turbo blade.

Water tower - Dakota Magic

a windmill turbo blade on a semi
South Dakota water tower
divider bar

Palisades State Park is a state park of South Dakota, USA, featuring cliffs and rock formations eroded out of pink Sioux Quartzite. The park is located just south of Garretson, 10 miles off Interstate 90. At only 157 acres, it is South Dakota's second-smallest state park. The Sioux Quartzite rocks are 1.2 billion years old and up to 50 feet high. They are exposed on either side of Split Rock Creek

South Dakota map showing location of Glacial Lakes Rest Stop
a visit Garretson sign
Palisades state Park sign

Lee Duquette got his first look at Chimney Rock in Palisades State Park

Lee Duquette at Chimney Rock in Palisades State Park
Chimney Rock in Palisades State Park
Chimney Rock in Palisades State Park
Chimney Rock in Palisades State Park
Chimney Rock in Palisades State Park
Split Rock Creek

Patten's Mill

sign about th village of Pallisades
panorama view of Chimney Rock and more

The two RV Gypsies explored the Balancing Rock Trail at Palisades State Park.

sing: Balancing Rock Trail
Karen Duquette looks up at the Balancing Rock
The Balancing Rock  at Pallisdes State Park
Karen Duquette at The Balancing Rock  at Pallisdes State Park
Karen Duquette at The Balancing Rock  at Pallisdes State Park

As the two RV Gypsies walked around the corner, Balancing Rock took on an entirely different look.

Balancing Rock
Balancing Rock
Lee Duquette descends just a few stairs.
panorama view at Palisades State Park

Lee Duquette realized that the view changed from wonderfully shaped rocks to flatness, so the two RV Gypsies decided not to walk any further on the trail.

Lee Duquette
Split Rock Creek

Just a few minutes later, the two RV Gypsies got back in their truck and drove across the 1908 Historic bridge. Karen snapped one more photo as they drove across the bridge.

the 1908 Historic bridge

Karen Duquette got out of the truck and took a photo from each side of the 1908 Historic Bridge at Palisades State Park.

view from the 1908 Historic bridge
view from the 1908 Historic bridge
sign about the Village of Palisades

The two RV Gypsies explored the King and Queen Trail at Palisades State Park

Lee Duquette reads the sign
Split Rock Creek

Just a short walk down the trail, the two RV Gypsies reached the King and Queen formation, but could not really figure out which was the Queen and which was the King. The trail continued on for views of Split Rock Creek, but the two RV Gypsies did not go any further on this trail because this was the end of the rock formation area.

divider bar

Later, the two RV Gypsies stopped at The Terry Redlin Art Center in Watertown, South Dakota. Although photos were not allowed to be taken inside the art gallery, this is a place that the two RV Gypsies highly recommend. It is more than just looking at fantastic paintings. It is a chance to see paintings come to life. Terry Redlin is known for his use of light, whether a campfire, a lamppost or a blazing sunset. Terry Redlin is a world famous artist and Watertown is his hometown. This art center is his way of thanking the City and the State for a scholarship he received after a brief ride on a motorcycle resulted in a life-changing injury. After visiting this art center, the two RV Gypsies are proud to claim Terry Redlin as their favorite artist.

Welcome to Watertown sign
the outside of the Terry Redlin Art Center in Watertown, SD
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Menu for The two RV Gypsies in South Dakota.
You may view these three sites in any order you choose.
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Falls Park in Sioux Falls Sculpture Walk
Palisades State Park & Terry Redlin Art Center
look below
<go to the next adventure of the two RV GypsiesAfter you have seen the three sections above, please continue on to Winnebago, Nebraska and learn some Indian history (this has nothing to do with Winnebago RV's).