Two RV Gypsies: Full-Time RVers
Page 3 of 4 - The Incline Railway at Royal Gorge Park

Below: A hummingbird at a feeder by the Incline Railway

A hummingbird at a feeder
A hummingbird at a feeder

Built in 1931, and traveling at a 45-degree angle, one of the world's steepest incline railways is still considered one of the most difficult structures ever built. Here, timeless granite walls loom all around as it descends over 1,500 feet to the canyon floor, a mere 50 feet at its widest. Looking up, the bridge appears as a delicate ribbon cutting across the sky.

Incline Railway car
Incline Railway ca
Two RV Gypisies in the Incline Railway car

Engineering Facts for the Incline Railway

  • Construction began in 1930 and completed in 1931

  • Length of incline: 1,550 feet

  • 100% grade, 45-degree angle

  • Powered by Otis Elevator with a completely automatic SCR drive system

  • Standby emergency diesel engine

  • Maximum speed: 11.4 mph

  • Rate of descent: 3 mph

  • Weight of cars: 4,500 pounds

  • Travel time: 5.5 minutes each way

  • Same engineering and construction crews that built the Bridge

  • Safety: 19 manually operated stopping devices, also equipped with automatic governor to stop each car

  • Listed on the National Historic Register

Photos below: The Incline Railway making its descent to the bottom of the gorge

the Incline Railway making its descent
the Incline Railway making its descent

looking backwards towards the top

looking backwards towards the top
Incline Railway

At the bottom of the gorge, looking up at the suspension bridge and the aerial tram.

the Royal Gorge Suspention Bridge
the aerial tram
the aerial tram

Stepping off the incline railway car, the two RV Gypsies enjoyed the cool spray of the roaring Arkansas River, while watching a white water kayaker brave the Class 5 rapids.

the roaring Arkansas River
Lee Duquette at the bottom of the gorge
kayaker
kayaker
sign: Royal Gorge wood stave pipeline

The incline cars waiting at the bottom of the gorge to take the two RV Gypsies and the other passengers back to the top of the gorge.

The incline cars
The incline cars

Before boarding the incline car, Lee Duquette took one last photo of the cliff because he liked the way the cliff was split.

cliffs
split cliff

The two RV Gypsies back inside the cage of the incline railway car, and ready to slowly ride back up to the top. Going up, the two RV Gypsies were facing downward toward the river - which means they were riding backwards. (This is a ride that you stand up in for the entire trip - no seats)

riding the incline railway up the gorge
riding the incline railway up the gorge
riding the incline railway up the gorge
riding the incline railway up the gorge
riding the incline railway up the gorge

BACK AT THE TOP - SOME VIEWS FROM INSPIRATION POINT

view of incline from inspriation point
view of incline from inspriation point
the incline railway cars

look below
Page 4 of 4 - Royal Gorge Bridge and Park - the zipline