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The two RV Gypsies
hiked in Ozone State Park
14563 TN-1
Rockwood, Tennessee 37854
October 7 , 2016

USA map showing location of TennesseeTN map showing location of Rockwood

Ozone Falls State Natural Area is a state natural area in Cumberland County, Tennessee, located in the Southeastern United States. It consists of 43 acres centered on Ozone Falls, a 110-foot plunge waterfall, and its immediate gorge along Fall Creek.

The area is managed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation and maintained by Cumberland Mountain State Park.

Ozone Falls is situated along Fall Creek, which drains a short section of the Cumberland Plateau between the Crab Orchard Mountains to the west and Walden Ridge to the east. The creek flows down from its source high in the Crab Orchard Mountains for a mile or so before steadying briefly as it enters the community of Ozone. Fall Creek enters the state natural area just after it passes under U.S. Route 70, which runs perpendicular to it. The creek spills over Ozone Falls a few hundred meters south of US-70.

Beyond Ozone Falls, Fall Creek slices through a small gorge and proceeds southward for several more miles before emptying into Piney Creek. The confluence of Piney and Fall Creek occurs at a point where Roane County, Cumberland County, and Rhea County all meet. Fall Creek is part of the Tennessee River watershed.

The Fall Creek that spills over Ozone Falls is not the same stream as the Fall Creek that spills over Fall Creek Falls in Van Buren County. The latter stream is part of the Cumberland River watershed.

sign: Ozone Falls Natural Area

sign:

The two RV Gypsies viewed the falls from the top, then headed down the rugged 3/4 mile trail to the bottom of the falls.

a view of Ozone Falls from the top ledge

beginning of the trail down to Ozone Falls

It was not the most difficult trail the two RV Gypsies have ever taken, but it was steep, and because of Lee's artificial knees, he found it easier to use an unconventional method to go from one big rock down to the next one.

Lee Duquette decending the steep rocks

Lee Duquette decending the steep rocks

Lee took a few moments to look up at the cliff and study the big holes that were in the cliff. After all, part of hiking is to stop and enjoy nature. This rock house was called "Gamblers Den".

Gamblers Den

Lee Duquette at Gamblers Den

The two RV Gypsies paused under the cliffs to enjoy the view.

Gamblers Den

the two RV Gypsies at Gamblers Den

Gamblers Den

Lee Duquette on the trail to Ozone Falls

As the two RV Gypsies got half way down the trail, they stopped to look down at Ozone Falls . On this date, the falls was just barely more than a trickle and hard to see in the photos, but the falls were still wonderful to see in person. (This area was in a drought at this time.) The fall plunges 110 feet over a sandstone cap rock. Because of its picturesque beauty Ozone Falls was selected for filming scenes from the movie "Jungle Book".

the rocky trail to Ozone Falls

a glimpse of Ozone Falls

Lee Duquette made his way down the last part of the trail.

the plunge pool is finally in view

Lee Duquette almost to the plunge pool

Lee made it to the plunge pool at the bottom of the trail.

Lee Duquette on the trail

Lee Duquette at the plunge pool

View looking up at Ozone Falls - again, the water can barely be seen in the photos. Legend has it that the area was named Ozone because of the stimulating quality of the air created by the mist that is generated after the long plunge of the water. In the 1800s, grist and sawmills were built above the falls. The last one washed over the falls during a spring flood in 1900.

looking up at Ozone Falls

looking up at Ozone Falls

Ozone Falls Ozone Falls
the two RV Gypsies at Ozone Falls

Lee Duquette at the plunge pool

Lee Duquette at the plunge pool

Since the bottom of the falls was not near any cliffs, Karen Duquette decided to get directly under the falls. The rocks that were wet were a bit slippery, but easy enough to maneuver.

Karen Duquette heading to the falls

Karen Duquette heading to the falls

Karen Duquette almost at Ozone Falls Karen Duquette underneath Ozone Falls

Karen actually stood directly under the falling water and got totally soaked. It was such a hot day and the cold water felt wonderful. Lee took a movie of Karen because she was really enjoying herself.

Karen Duquette underneath Ozone Falls a very wet Karen, wringing out her blouse
a wet and cooled down Karen Duquette

Finally, Lee decided to check out the falls too, but he just quickly put part of his head in the water. Again, the water is hard to see in the photos, but the white spot on the ground is part of the falling water.

Lee Duquette approached Ozone Falls

Lee putting his head under Ozone Falls

Then it was time for the two RV Gypsies to work their way back up the rocks.

the rocky trail back up

the rocky trail back up

the rocky trail back up

Lee Duquette

a very wet Karen

Karen Duquette at Ozone Falls

Karen Duquette at Ozone Falls

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