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The two RV Gypsies
in Mount Rainier National Park in Washington state
July 18, 2013

Mt. Rainier National Park sign

Active steam vents, periodic earth tremors, and historic eruptions provide evidence that Mount Rainier is sleeping, not dead. Seismic monitoring stations around the mountains should provide days or weeks of advance warning of impending eruptions. Other geologic hazards, however, can occur with little warning, including debris flows and rockfalls.

Mt. Rainier National Park sign
Mt. Rainier
Panaorama of Karen Duquette photographng Mt. Rainier

At 14,410 feet high, Mount Rainier is the tallest peak in the Cascade Range and an icon of the Pacific Northwest. While the mountain's well-known profile is visible for many miles in any direction, its alpine glacier-clad slopes occupy only a third of Mount Rainier National Park.

Mount Rainier
Mount Rainier

Kautz Creek in Rainier National Park - elevation 2,409 feet

View from the road of Kautz Creek and the tip of Mt. Rainier. This part of Kautz Creek trail is a short, wheelchair accessible boardwalk and viewpoint.

Kautz Creek in Mount Ranier National Park
Kautz Creek in Mount Ranier National Park

Carter Falls Trail - The two RV Gypsies decided not to worry about getting to the falls because it was so rocky, and they figured that the trail must get steep after the log bridge. Their main interest at this time was the log bridge.

Carter Falls Trail
Mount Rainier
Lee Duquette and Mount Rainier
panorama of Mount Rainier as seen from Carter Falls trail
the rocky Carter Falls trail
the rocky Carter Falls trail and the river
wood debris on Carter Falls trail
wood debris on Carter Falls trail

View of the river from each side of the log bridge

View of the river from the log bridge
View of the river from the log bridge

Below: Lee Duquette on the log bridge - yes it shook a bit when several people were on it, but not as much as many of the suspension bridges that the two RV Gypsies have been on. But this is a totally new experience - a log bridge so close to a raging river.

Lee Duquette on the log bridge
Lee Duquette on the log bridge

Karen Duquette steadied her camera on the log bridge to photograph the water flowing underneath, while Lee took a butt shot of Karen.

Karen Duquette taking photos of the river
he water flowing underneath the bridge
Karen Duquette on the log bridge
Mount Rainier as seen from the log bridge
Lee Karen Duquette on the log bridge

The two RV Gypsies walked across the log bridge, took some photos and returned to the parking lot. They decided not to try and find the actual falls.

panorama of the log bridge

Karen Duquette coming back over the log bridge

Karen Duquette coming back over the log bridge
Karen Duquette coming back over the log bridge
Karen Duquette coming back over the log bridge

Karen Duquette felt the temperature of a cascade of water by the roadside

Karen Duquette feels the temperature of a cascade of water by the roadside
Karen Duquette feels the temperature of a cascade of water by the roadside
Christine Falls viewpoint sign
Christine Falls

First the two RV Gypsies viewed Christine Falls from the roadside bridge.

Christine Falls
Christine Falls

Then the two RV Gypsies walked down a short but steep hill to look at Christine Falls as it flowed under the roadside bridge.

Christine Falls
Christine Falls

Karen took a photo of Lee, who was a few feet below her on the viewing platform at Christine Falls.

Karen takes a photo of Lee
Lee viewing Christine Falls at Mt Rainier NP

Lee Duquette checked out a big tree laying on the ground by Christine Falls. But he could not see over the big tree for any further photos.

Lee Duquette checking out a big tree laying on the ground by Christine Falls

Nisqually River - elevation 3,820 feet

View of Nisqually River from each side of the bridge

View of Nisqually River
View of Nisqually River

View of Nisqually River from a roadside lookout a bit up the street - looking back towards the bridge. The river was hard to see because the river bed had a lot of rocks on each side of the narrow Nisqually River.

View of Nisqually River from a roadside lookout
View of Nisqually River from a roadside lookout

Views of Mt. Rainier from different lookouts in Mount Rainier National Park

Mount Rainier
Mount Rainier
Mount Rainier
Mount Rainier
Mount Rainier

Narada Falls

View of  Narada Falls as seen the side of the bridge alongside the parking lot

Narada Falls
flowers
flowers

Half way down the trail to Narada Falls, there was a sign "On your way down the trail, you stepped back in geologic history. You walked from a Mount Rainier lava flow less than half a million years old, to the rocks of the Tatoosh Range that were intruded into this area."

Narada Falls
Narada Falls

The two RV Gypsies at Narada Falls in Mount Rainier National Park. It was a warm day, so they really enjoyed the fine mist spray from Narada Falls.

The two RV Gypsies at Narada FallsĀ in Mount Rainier National Park The two RV Gypsies at Narada FallsĀ in Mount Rainier National Park

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