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Harbor Seals and Sea Otters
- Sea Lions, Eagles & Meares Glacier caving - and ice fields - (page 3 of 5)
The Common Seal, also known as the Harbor Seal or alternately spelled Harbour Seal, is a true seal found along temperate and Arctic marine coastlines of the Northern hemisphere. They are found in coastal waters of the northern Atlantic and Pacific Oceans as well as those of the Baltic and North Seas, making them the most wide-ranging of the pinnipeds (walruses, eared seals, and true seals).
 
Harbor Seal and baby
Harbor Seals
 
Harbor Seal and baby
Harbor Seal and baby

Common seals are brown, tan, or gray, with distinctive V-shaped nostrils. An adult can attain a length of 6.1 feet and a mass of 290 pounds Females outlive males (30-35 years versus 20-25 years). Common seals stick to familiar resting spots, generally rocky areas where land predators can't reach them, near a steady supply of fish to eat. Males fight over mates underwater. Females mate with the strongest males, and then bear single pups which they care for alone. Pups are able to swim and dive within hours of birth, and they grow quickly on their mothers' milk. A fatty tissue called blubber keeps them warm.

 
\Harbor Seal and baby
Harbor Seal
Their global population is 400,000 to 500,000, and subspecies in certain habitats are threatened. Seal hunting, once a common practice, is now mostly illegal.
 
Harbor Seals
Harbor Seals
Harbor Seals
SEA OTTERS
The sea otter is a marine mammal native to the coasts of the northern and eastern North Pacific Ocean. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 30 to 100 pounds, making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals. Unlike most marine mammals, the sea otter's primary form of insulation is an exceptionally thick coat of fur, the densest in the animal kingdom. Although it can walk on land, the sea otter is capable of living exclusively in the ocean.
 
SEA OTTERS
SEA OTTER
 
SEA OTTER
SEA OTTER
The sea otter inhabits near shore environments where it can quickly dive to the sea floor to forage. It preys mostly upon marine invertebrates such as sea urchins, various mollusks and crustaceans, and some species of fish. Its foraging and eating habits are noteworthy in several respects. Its use of rocks to dislodge prey and to open shells makes it one of the few mammal species to use tools.
 
SEA OTTERS
SEA OTTERS
 
SEA OTTERS
SEA OTTERS
Sea otters, whose numbers were once estimated at 150,000–300,000, were hunted extensively for their fur between 1741 and 1911, and the world population fell to 1,000–2,000 individuals in a fraction of their historic range. A subsequent international ban on hunting, conservation efforts, and reintroduction programs into previously populated areas have contributed to numbers rebounding, and the species now occupies about two-thirds of its former range. The recovery of the sea otter is considered an important success in marine conservation, although populations in the Aleutian Islands and California have recently declined or have plateaued at depressed levels. For these reasons (as well as its particular vulnerability to oil spills) the sea otter remains classified as an endangered species.
 
a sea otter
sea otters
 
a sea otter
a sea otter diving into the water
 
 sea otters
 sea otters
 
 sea otter
 sea otter

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