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Mud Pots & more in Yellowstone
- September 5, 2009 -

history bookThe more popular geysers often overshadow the mud pots. Although the mud pots may not be as picturesque as the hot springs and pools, these turbulent pools of hot, muddy water, and bizarre landscapes are another feature that makes Yellowstone National Park so unique. As you experience the mud pots and volcanoes, be aware that you are close to one of the major vents from which lava flowed through the caldera's collapse. These areas are active and known as resurging domes. They are being monitored closely for information about future volcanic activity. As you experience the mud pots, you are certain to smell a distinct odor. The presence of sulfur in mud pots separates them from Hot Springs. In the form of hydrogen sulfide gas, sulfur is what creates the infamous odor.

 

The two RV Gypsies had to walk up a trail to get to the mud pots. This is Karen's favorite area.

boiling mud pot
boiling mud pot

history bookWhere hot water is limited and hydrogen sulfide gas is present (emitting the "rotten egg" smell common to thermal areas), sulfuric acid is generated. The acid dissolves the surrounding rock into fine particles of silica and clay that mix with what little water there is to form the seething and bubbling mud pots. The sights, sounds, and smells of areas like Artist and Fountain paint pots and Mud Volcano make these curious features some of the most memorable in the park.

boiling mud pot
boiling mud pot
boiling mud pot
boiling mud pot

The two RV Gypsies walked to the top of the trail and looked down at the steam vents .

looking down at the steam vents
looking down at the steam vents

looking down at the trail

looking down at the trail
looking down at the trail
looking down at the trail
looking down at the trail
steam vents
steam vents
steam vents
the trail
trail
hot pockets

Leaving the mud pots, the two RV Gypsies came to an area in the road that was so different from the rest of the road area in Yellowstone. In just this short area, big boulders lined the side of the curvy road and it was quite a beautiful site to behold. Photos had to be taken out the front window of the moving car.

boulders lining the road
boulders lining the road
boulders lining the road
boulders lining the road
boulders lining the road
boulders lining the road
sign - warath falls
 warath falls
 warath falls
scenery in Yellowstone
scenery in Yellowstone

Another waterfall

waterfall
waterfall
scenery in Yellowstone
scenery in Yellowstone
scenery in Yellowstone

Petrified Tree

Petrified Tree
look below

go to the next adventure of the two RV Gypsies Please continue on to page 4 of 4 - Calcite Springs Overlook in Yellowstone National Park