Two RV Gypsies: Full-Time RVers
eyeball window screen for the RV
den sign for the two RV gypsies eturn to the home page of the two RV Gypsies
History of the two RV Gypsies
e-mail the two RV Gypsies
Please sign the Guestbook of the Two RV Gypsies. Thanks. links to other full-time RV sites and more helpful and important information for RVers sign: The two RV Gypsies
Learn about Brian Duquette
index to the photos on this website
see  travel photos of the two RV Gypsies in the continental USA
see the photos the two RV Gypsies took during their travels in Canada see the photos the two RV Gypsies took during their travels in Canada find out what's new on this website
go to the Table of Contents for this website

map showing location of the two RV Gypsies at the Valley of Fire State Park

The two RV Gypsies
at Valley of Fire State Park
in Nevada
September 11, 2012

The road to Valley of Fire was full of the dips and curves that the two RV Gypsies are becoming accustomed to seeing and driving on. The mountains were mostly rocky with scattered patches of greenery.

The road to Valley of Fire is full of dips and curves
dips so big that the road dissappears

Then the mountains changed and were very black in color and razor sharp in shape. Amazing. These are named The Muddy Mountains.

mountains are are very black in color
mountains are are very black in color
Muddy Mountain full of holes

The mountains changed yet again, and the two RV Gypsies noticed that the mountains were full of big holes.

the mountains are full of big holes.
the mountains are full of big holes.

Valley of Fire is one of the Nevada's oldest state parks, with 3,000-year-old petroglyphs carved in sandstone and breathtaking views of maroon-colored rock formations.

It covers an area of almost 42,000 acres and was dedicated in 1935. It derives its name from red sandstone formations, formed from great shifting sand dunes during the age of dinosaurs. These features, which are the centerpiece of the park's attractions, often appear to be on fire when reflecting the sun's rays.

Valley of Fire is located 50 miles northeast of Las Vegas, at an elevation between 2,000–2,600 feet. It abuts the Lake Mead National Recreation Area at the Virgin River confluence. It lies in a 4 by 6 mile basin.

sign: Valley of Fire State Park

Beehives: The Beehives are sandstone formations that not only demonstrate the unique design that can be created by nature, but is an excellent representation of geologic cross-bedding via the grooved lines going in different directions. The layers or beds represent different layers of silt that are deposited at different times. The beds indicate the angle of the wind or water that was moving at the time the material was deposited. Cross-bedding is very common in sand dunes, beach deposits, and river sediments.

Below: A short path winds through rocky dunes with the hills of the Muddy Mountains visible in the distance. Once part of a sand deposit that covered a vast area, these rocks have been subjected to a relentless attack by harsh winds, rain, heat and cold, creating the many unusual formations that make up the Valley of Fire.

Beehives at Valley of Fire State Park

Below is the two RV Gypsies' favorite part of this park.

Beehives at Valley of Fire State Park
Beehives at Valley of Fire State Park
Beehives at Valley of Fire State Park

Lee Duquette tried to hide in a beehive at Valley of Fire State Park in Nevada, but eagle-eyed Karen saw him before he could completely disappear into the rock formation.

Lee Duquette tries to hide in a beehive
Lee Duquette tries to hide in a beehive
Beehives at Valley of Fire State Park
Beehives at Valley of Fire State Park
Beehives at Valley of Fire State Park
Beehives at Valley of Fire State Park

Notice the mountain range called The Muddy Mountains in the background of this panorama and in the photo below it.

panorama of Beehives at Valley of Fire State Park
black mountains behind the Beehive section
close-up of a Beehive
Beehives at Valley of Fire State Park
Karen Duquette by a Beehive
Karen Duquette inside a Beehive at Valley of Fire State Park

Karen Duquette went into a Beehive and found a window to look out of. Lee put the camera on self-timer and tried to join Karen but could not get there in time.

Karen Duquette inside a Beehive at Valley of Fire State Park
The two RV Gypsies have fun in a beehive at Valley of Fire State Park

Atlatl Rock

sign about Atlatal Rock
Atlatl Rock

The roads in the Valley of Fire were full of dips, same as the regular roads

The roads in the Valley of Fire are full of dips

NATURAL ARCH: Arches form when hollows inside the rock are exposed by erosion -- both wind and water. Sandstone is a soft rock that cracks easily, and its weak points often fill with rainwater, which causes it to soften even more. Unable to withstand the blasting of strong winds and the slow dissolving away by rains of the cementing materials holding its sand grains together, the rock weakens allowing an arch to form. Eventually, it will grow too large for its support and nature's forces will complete their work of destruction.

Karen Duquette under the Natural Arch at Valley of Fire State Park

Lee walked around to the back of the Natural Arch for another viewpoint.

the Natural Arch at Valley of Fire State Park

Lee walks around to the back of the Natural Arch

From this viewpoint, the arch itself can not be seen.

From this viewpoint, the arch itself can not be seen

Lee got a nice clear photo of the Arch from the other side of the formation.

the Arch from the other side of the formation.

Karen later read that it has been reported on internet sites that this arch collapsed May 30, 2010, but the the RV Gypsies took the above photos on September 11, 2012, so that just is not true.

 

The two RV Gypsies walked a short trail to see petrified logs, only to discover that the only petrified logs were very small ones in a screened in area. It was not worth the walk, even though the walk was short and easy.

Lee Duquette walks along the trail looking for Petrified Logs
the only Petrified Log is screened in.

A very unique structure next to the Visitors Center

A very unique structure next to the Visitors Center

Hedgehog Cactus: Long, sharp spines like those of a hedgehog or porcupine cactus protect the cylindrical stems of this cactus. Serval stems usually make up a clump. Attractive hot pink blossoms appear during the early spring and produce a fruit that tastes like strawberries, although the two RV Gypsies are NOT recommending that anyone pick or taste the fruit on the cactus.

Hedgehog Cactus
Hedgehog Cactus

The two RV Gypsies took a picnic lunch break and watched the little chipmunks running all around the area. They ran very fast.

little chipmunks running all around
little chipmunks running all around

The view from the two RV Gypsies' picnic table at Valley of Fire State Park

The view from the two RV Gypsies' picnic table at Valley of Fire
look down to continue

Valley of Fire State Park was so amazing, and each area is unique. In order to help the photos load faster, the photos have been placed on three different pages.
continue on to the next adventure of the two RV GypsiesPlease continue on to page 2 of the Valley of Fire for the Petroglyph Canyon.